Week 2: Digital Publishing & Research

In this week, students will learn:

  • basic elements that make up a website
  • how to set up a website with an external hosting service & custom domain
  • how to install software on a server
  • basic skills for using WordPress
  • other tools for digital historical research
Tuesday, January 30

Joining the 1%: Or, Becoming Digitally Creative

Note: In this class, we will be establishing an online presence with Reclaim Hosting & installing and learning to use WordPress. Please bring credit card information to this class session to pay the registration fee. Also, WAIT to do this in class, where I will give you a coupon code for a 10% discount!  Finally, you may want to be thinking ahead of time about the domain name you will choose.

Reading:
 Cohen & Rosenzweig, Digital History Chapter 2, “Getting Started” (please note that there are multiple sections of this chapter, and you can navigate through them by the menu on the left, or by using the arrow button at the bottom)
“The Web We Need to Give Students”
“Web-Hosting Project Hopes to Help Students Reclaim Digital Destinies”  Wired Campus blog, The Chronicle of Higher Education.
Sample student sites (please visit each and explore how these students use their domain space):
http://www.tibert.net/
http://missambermay.com/
http://melissanix.middcreate.net/
http://skepticaloptimist.middcreate.net/
Part II: Researching History Online

Episode 092: Sharon Block, How to Research History Online

Reading:

“How Does Google Work? Learn How Google Works: Search Engine + AdWords.”  http://www.ppcblog.com/how-google-works/.

Cohen, Dan. “Is Google Good for History?” Dan Cohen, January 7, 2010. http://www.dancohen.org/2010/01/07/is-google-good-for-history/.

Lab: Digital research management with Zotero

1. View the videos below:

Ready, Set, Zotero!

Introduction to Zotero

 

 


Homework (due 5:00 pm Monday, February 5)
  1. Download and install Zotero from here. Practice adding at least 2-3 sources to Zotero, using the methods demonstrated in the video.
  2. Write a blog post (approx. 250 words or so) on your new WordPress site. The post should reflect on 1) what you’ve learned about digital history thus far in the semester, and 2) speculate about what you might use your new personal domain space for.  Email me the link to your post once it is finished.
  3. Share your new domain and blog via social media, or email it to at least three friends/family members

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